ISSUE 18
November 2001

H. Bruce McEver

 

H. Bruce McEver's poems have been published in Ploughshares, Westview, The Berkshire Review, and The Connecticut River Review. During the day, he's the president of Berkshire Capital Corporation, an investment banking firm in New York City advising on mergers and acquisitions with financial institutions. He lives on Utopia Ltd. farm in Salisbury, Connecticut.
Horus     


1.

City birdwatchers bunch,
binocular-eyed, at the rim
of the model boat basin to watch
a reluctant red-tail fledge
from a stick nest over the arch
of a Fifth Avenue high-rise;
at first, the eyas* tries a tenuous flutter,
then he dives and soars
into a feathered crossbow.

Son of Osiris and Isis,
the falcon-faced god of light's
effigy crowns the obelisk
in Central Park,
first stood in Heliopolis
in 1600 BC and given by Egypt
to the City of New York.

At home I rip
open mail with a silver horus-headed blade
bought in a Cairo Casbah
and read in a book about
Ramesses' coronation,
and the astonishment
of the assembled court,
when a falcon dove out of the sun
to land on the prince's shoulder!


2.

The hieroglyph translation
on the obelisk reads:
The Horus, Strong-Bull...
the King of Upper and Lower Egypt
Chosen-of-Ra the Golden Horus
mighty-in-years-and-great
of victories, Beloved of Amen
who came forth from the womb
to receive the crowns of the Two Lands.

On a clear storm-scrubbed
morning after a run, I stretch
under the obelisk watching
Horus incarnate rip
the guts from a plump
city pigeon atop
the Met's roof-garden pavilion,
screaming the sheer whistle
annunciation
of the god's
return.


* a nesting hawk

 

 

H. Bruce McEver : Poetry
Copyright 2001 The Cortland Review Issue 18The Cortland Review