ISSUE 15
February 2001

Daniel Wood

 

Daniel Wood's poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Paris Review, The Comstock Review, Ekphrasis, and others. A graduate of Columbia's M.F.A. program, he currently works in Manhattan and is trying to come to terms with the fact that he now lives in New Jersey.
The Quaker Meeting House    Click to hear in real audio


Round-bales after dusk become
black rocks or bent men,
spines arced from carrying
a burden as terrible as God.
Barbed wire, strung between

locust posts sloughing their bark,
keeps things in, herding any
that move toward the possessive structure;
the slow pull of a drawstring gathering

the pouch neck. When the sky silvers,
the cross against the disc moon becomes
sighting hairs, but there is no gunpowder crack
as an animal skulks down the steps,
lit eyes considering: a setting out.

 

 

Daniel Wood: Poetry
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